27 June 2016

Casa da Ínsua: Hotel, Museum or Little Paradise?


Last week I already shared what I brought back from this Parador but I promised to show some pictures of the hotel itself:
Casa da Ínsua - entrance
The stone staircase to the lobby.
Casa da Ínsua- Inside yard
The inside patio. 
Casa da Ínsua - back gardens
A view from the back garden.
Casa da Ínsua - water lilies
A pond full of water lilies.
Casa da Ínsua - pond with ducks and swans
A larger pond with a swan.
Casa da Ínsua - swans
In fact there were two swans, one was a bit more aggressive than the other (the hubby almost lost his fingers when feeding them some bread crumbs).
Casa da Ínsua - ballroom
A ballroom with a piano and a huge fireplace.
Casa da Ínsua - Japanese room
The Japanese room.
Casa da Ínsua - portrait room
The portrait room.
Casa da Ínsua - old kitchen
The old kitchen that is now only used for wine & food tastings and workshops.
Casa da Ínsua - clockwork
A huge clockwork that occupied two stories (the pendulums went all the way down to the previous one).
Casa da Ínsua - chapel
The chapel that features the clock that I showed in the picture above.
Casa da Ínsua - bedroom
Our bedroom: the bed was huge and high up, I almost needed a staircase to climb on it.
Casa da Ínsua - bathroom
A standard but roomy bathroom.
Casa da Ínsua - sitting room
And we were upgraded to a junior suite (I'm still not sure why?) so we had a sitting room that we never got to use.

There still was much, much more to visit, so if you've liked the hotel so far I'd recommend you pay it a visit if you're ever in the area. The town is called Penalva do Castelo in Portugal.

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